Lilly's Memories

June 14, 2019

One day in the IVs on the Roof Yard, I was playing tag with a few of my friends. I decided that I would chase one particular person, and I was determined to catch him. Once we had begun to play, we were running on top and around boxes until my target went up the ladder to the slide. I followed him up, and he slid down. Anxiously trying to catch him, I tried to go down the slide at a faster rate than what I was used to. This was a mistake. I ended up tragically falling off the slide onto my arm, which I later found out was broken.

The moment I landed on the ground, I was in shock; I did not know what had just happened. Then the pain hit, and I knew something was wrong. It was not a normal bruise like most other times I had fallen. This time I could hardly move my arm. 

When I was a VI, my class had a vote to decide whether we were going to make a restaurant or a library. The majority vote determined that we would have a restaurant which we later named Cafe of Colors. Each student had to write a job application to be one of the helpers in the restaurant. I became a chef, which was my top choice. 

I vividly remember the opening of the restaurant. I was back in the kitchen with my fellow chefs, and my head chef Erin made broccoli cheddar soup and pancakes. I remember toward the end of our restaurant project, Erin snuck all of the chefs a pancake. Let me tell you, I thought I was jealous of our customers before, but the moment that pancake went in my mouth, I thought we were spoiling our clientele. 

When my class and I worked on the Brooklyn Bridge in the VIIs, everyone was assigned a specific part. I worked on the Brooklyn caisson, the walkway, and the roadway with my friend Zoe McFarland. We worked meticulously painting them, and they turned out perfect.

Once we had shared the completed bridge with parents, faculty, and students, it was time to pick up the bridge. The roadway and the walkway were the first to be removed, and either Zoe or I would be able to keep them. I was distracted by the hal taken down bridge, when my teacher, Vanessa, asked which one of us would prefer to keep the walkway, which in my opinion, was the better of the two. 

While I was paying attention to something else entirely, Zoe claimed  my beloved walkway. I still have the roadway, which is just a long piece of wood, painted black with yellow stripes. I see it every day, and it is a reminder of the opportunity I missed that meant so much to me when I was younger. 

About halfway through the XIs’ year, each student made a linoleum cut in Art that would later be printed on the printing press. We printed each cut on small cards that we would later be sold in adorable bundles with ribbons.

We made these bundles in a very organized fashion. There were about 23 piles of each individual card. On the whiteboard, red and blue ribbons hung, waiting to be wrapped around the piles of cards. Each student lined up behind their individual card they printed, and the process commenced. We rotated around collecting one of each card, and added it to our growing stack. Once we had collected one of each card, we went to the whiteboard, and carefully tied a ribbon. We repeated this process until there were no more cards. 

The project that I am most proud of making throughout all of my years at C&C must be the Parthenon, which my class and I made in the XIIs. We had two weeks to make a precisely scaled down version of the famed Ancient Greek temple.

We got to work right away. I was assigned to make the roof and acroterion. It was difficult to get the exact angle of the roof, but Sarah Whittier and I eyed it. I then helped Marco finish the frieze because he had scaled it down incorrectly. Once Marco’s problem was remedied, I began to draw one of the tympaniums. I was very proud of my drawing, as it is one of the biggest and most recognizable pieces on the Parthenon. 

I meticulously drew each figure on the triangular piece of cardstock I had cut. I shaded it to ensure it looked as if I had carved it into marble as the Ancient Greeks had thousands of years ago.

Once the entire structure was assembled, I knew all of our hard work paid off. It really did look like the real Parthenon, just much, much smaller. We included hand drawn copies of each art piece, and a to scale version of Athena, goddess of wisdom and war. 

The XIIIs longest and by far most eventful trip was to Chicago, Illinois. We stayed there for five days, four nights. As you can imagine, many memories were made. Our trip to Chicago was like a redo of the Country Trip just with no “country” and it was much colder. During our time there it reached (if I remember correctly) -23 degrees Fahrenheit with a windchill factor of -52 degrees.

Because of this abnormal weather, we had to stay inside for most of  two  days. On Wednesday morning, we scheduled a bus tour to see a variety of Chicago’s neighborhoods. Unfortunately, the windows of the bus had frozen from the inside. At least every five minutes, we had to scrape away the ice using metro cards or pieces of paper. A tour meant to be predominantly for the eyes, turned into one for the ears, which I’m sure the guide was not prepared to do. 

Once this was over, we went back to the hotel and had social hour where students could visit each other's rooms. We did this, went swimming, and exercised in the weight room for the entire day, until we ate dinner and went to bed. 

Thursday was the second coldest day and instead of staying inside, we visited the Willis Tower. We got on two elevators, both of which I did not trust, and went to the very top floor. This is where the glass “sky boxes” are. The “sky boxes” jut out from the side of the building, and are made completely of glass. This is not meant for people with vertigo as the floor is made of glass, and you can see the ground hundreds of feet below you. 

At first I was a bit afraid, but I knew that the box could never fall, and the glass I stood on was capable of holding a lot of weight, so I went for it. It was thrilling, and I do not regret taking that chance. 

I have countless other memories but if I were to write all of them, this entire issue would be solely about my memories at C&C. 

 

 

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