The Notre Dame: Burning More Than You Could Imagine

May 3, 2019

 

On Tuesday, April 15th, 2019, the most recognized cathedral in all of France, the Notre-Dame de Paris, more simply known as Notre-Dame, suffered from a devastating fire.

   The cathedral’s fire alarm went off at 6:20 P.M. at the church, but after a brief search, no fire was discovered. However, another fire alarm went off at 6:43 pm, and the fire now had clearly spread. In less than an hour, the fire had spread to the spire of Notre-Dame, and just minutes after that, the spire fell, a fall truly so devastating to native onlookers.

The cathedral continued to burn, a 15 hour period in total until the fire was put out, but the damage had already been done. The forest, the top half of the cathedral where the fire began, got severely damaged by the fire, as well as a large portion of the roof, and the spire. Since there was also a lot of breaking and falling projectiles, more damaging instances occurred on the bottom floor.

The Notre Dame Cathedral is one of the only pieces of architecture from the medieval world of France that has been kept intact. The cathedral's construction was begun in 1160 under Bishop Maurice de Sully and was largely complete by 1260, though it was modified frequently in the following centuries. The Cathedral is the most visited monument in the city, Through all the wars and battles that have happened on Paris’ soil, this is the way the most renowned place of worship in all of France is damaged.

Writing this, it has been about a week since the fire took place, and no one is certain of what caused the fire in the first place. The original ideas of what caused the fire were along the lines of the renovation, and people thought that the construction workers were being lethargic with their work, and the vast majority of people have come to this indeterminate conclusion that the cause of the fire was an electrical short circuit, but several news sites have argued that claim, saying there is “no evidence,” behind it.

For someone who spent seven years of their life in the city of lights, Sarah Whittier, XIIs Group Teacher, has the closest connection of anyone at C&C to the Notre Dame fire. “Notre Dame was always just there. Solid, heavy, dark, cool stones, musty chapels…. The fire at Notre Dame was a gut-punch. It felt personal. I imagine that anyone who's spent time in Paris or visited Notre Dame will feel the same way.”

The Notre Dame fire will go down as one of the most devastating incidents of burning in the 21st century. However, over one billion dollars has been raised to rebuild what was destroyed in the fire, more than enough to reconstruct the famous religious landmark. Nonetheless, Notre Dame fire Cathedral was a horrific incident.

 

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