Students are Gaming During Class

 

As people know, the students of City and Country are required to sign an agreement saying that all technology offered by the school is to be used for schoolwork only. However, this agreement seems to have been breached, specifically in the Upper School.

Recently, the students of XIIsP were banned from using earphones due to certain people listening to inappropriate rap music. Listening to music is already a violation of tech agreement policy #1, which states that “students will use C&C’s technology for school related work only.” The crux of the matter is that doing almost anything, such as watching Youtube videos or playing games, is inherently distracting to others. A good majority of the upper school’s work time is spent on computers doing independent projects like the XIIIs newspaper, or the research papers that the XIs and XIIs write. A Xllls explains that the only reason that they play games is because they know the material that they are going over in class, or they are bored from the activity, so they rely on computer games. “I already took my test, so I just play games during APL” said another Xlll. “At times, if someone is sitting in front of me is playing a game or searching random things, my attention drifts away from the class discussion or project.” said an anonymous Xllls

Pete Weiss, the XllsP teacher explained that his classroom is a casual environment. Not in the XIIs but in the whole upper school, students are on computers increasingly often. Kids playing on computers or searching unrelated things to class may be distracting and it is also rude to the teachers.“It may affect other people’s ability to get work done,” said Pete.

The XIIIs teacher, Trayshia Rogers, believes that her students have far too much work to do to play games. She explained that it might be acceptable if you play games but also get work done consistently. However, it is clear that playing games is a recipe for disaster. “It’s important that I see what is going on on their screens,” said Trayshia.

Michele Bloom, C&C’s Director of upper and middle school, said, “Our hope is that kids learn to monitor themselves.” Teachers trust students to use computers appropriately and respect the rules surrounding them. Using computers is a way for kids to discover the ins and outs of independent work. The internet provides a whole host of distractions and school is a great place to learn self-disciplinary habits. Many students play video games outside of school and probably get derailed by them on weeknights. This interrupts them working on their homework, which is more important than gaming. Since they get distracted at home, it is easy for them to lose focus at school.

Ian Klapper, the computer teacher, says that there are pros and cons to video games. “People having to sneak playing games is counter productive.” He also stressed the fact that video games provide a whole host of possibilities when it comes to content creation. “Analyzing and creating a game is very different from just blowing off steam.” Ian acknowledges that having to relax throughout the day is not unacceptable, but there are other ways to relax besides playing video games as Michele said. People have plenty of time to play video games at home. There is no reason to risk computer privileges for a mere couple minutes of gameplay.

How reputable is the claim that kids who play games at home are more likely to lose focus in school? Out of the 16 XIIIs who play video games at home, all of them have admitted to playing games in school. Out of the 6 XIIIs that do not play video games at home, 5 of them have played video games in school. This statistic shows that yes, there is indeed a problem here, and there is no school better equipped to handle it then City and Country.

 

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